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Salt Ashes Tells Us About Her New ‘Girls’ Music Video

“What matters is getting rid of the stereotyping of women not being able to do shit for themselves.”

Electronic singer-songwriter Salt Ashes, real name Veiga Sanchez, has been on our radar for a while now. A few months ago, she unveiled the stunning bop ‘Girls’ and it’s been on heavy rotation ever since.

This week, Salt Ashes released the music video for the track and it’s just as good as we hoped it would be. The video, which Sanchez directed herself, is a celebration of empowerment (just like the track itself) and combines glossy shots with well-choreographed scenes and clips from people who felt inspired by the track.

To celebrate the video release, we managed to have a quick catch up with Salt Ashes to talk about her independent spirit, how the response to ‘Girls’ has been and just what it meant to be able to create such an empowering video.

Hey! How has the response to ‘Girls’ been like since you released the track?

It’s been great! The song landed on some awesome Spotify playlists like The Pop List which lead to over 200k streams in a couple of weeks, so that makes me happy but the best part has been hearing how many people relate to the song and how they’ve found it empowering. That’s the ultimate goal.

You directed the music video for the track, how was that for you?

I absolutely love directing. I love seeing the finished product stem from something that was just an idea in my head and being the one holding the steering wheel along the way. It means I get to fully make the video I wanted to make. It can be challenging being both director and artist though but I like challenges and learning from experiences.

As a woman in the music industry, more often than not, people assume that all I do is sing and I have people who write my songs, produce my tracks, direct my videos etc but it’s just not that way. It wouldn’t matter if it was that way, but what matters is getting rid of the stereotyping of women not being able to do shit for themselves.

Right now I’m managing myself, directing, writing, producing and I’ve only just scratched the surface… I’m forever learning and am so grateful I’m able to do all of this.

What matters is getting rid of the stereotyping of women not being able to do shit for themselves.

How important was it for you to create a video that represented people who identify as female and gender-fluid?

It was very important – I guess essentially I wanted the message of the video to be a ‘fuck you’ to stereotyping and to what the media makes us think we want to see in a video.

To me, it doesn’t matter what someone’s gender is or even if they don’t want to associate with a gender. Be who you want to be and let others be who they want to be! I know it’s cliched stuff but as long as no one is hurting anyone then I don’t see what the fucking problem is.

The song is about people making assumptions based on the way you dress or the person that you are so essentially stereotyping and people pushing you into being something you are not. I wanted to be fully inclusive in the video – but to be honest, I don’t even think it was a conscious decision – it was like, yeah “anyone who considers themselves female, even if for just one day of the week” get involved!

The song is about people making assumptions based on the way you dress or the person that you are so essentially stereotyping and people pushing you into being something you are not.

The video features clips sent in from people, were there any in particular that inspired or moved you?

Every single clip I got sent in was incredible!! Seriously, I was so surprised. I thought there were going to be some bad one or ones that I just wouldn’t be able to use but honestly, all of them were awesome – They were each so creative and really honest to themselves. The variety I received was amazing and they were all directed by each individual!

One submission that really moved me was from Camille Geekie who wrote a whole story of her feeling insecure and confined when she dressed more feminine, with her hair down and then beginning to feel more alive and free when she tied her hair up and is skateboarding and dressing more androgynous. I feel so honoured that Camille fully expressed herself and shared her story with me and allowed me to include parts of it in the video. That’s what I wanted… honest, real people expressing themselves in whatever way they wanted, ignoring what they felt society wants.

What else have you got in store for the rest of 2018?

My next single is coming out at the beginning of October which I’m excited about. I’m writing a lot at the moment, collaborating too which is always interesting and now working on the next video for the next release!

Click HERE to stream ‘Girls’

You can find Salt Ashes online here: WebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagram

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